Through the River

Through the River

Through the River: Understanding Assumptions About Truth — Hirst, Hirst, and Hiebert 2009—200pp.

Jon and Mindy Hirst thoughtfully present teachings absorbed by the authors from a book by Dr Paul Hiebert (1999), using a visual analogy, based upon three communities of people living in different ways around River Town. Each community lives by and depicts a particular epistemology—a ‘truth lens’—either positivism, instrumentalism and critical realism, respectively.

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Exploration

To me exploration isn’t about conquering natural obstacles, planting flags… It’s not about going where no one’s gone before in order to leave your mark, but about the opposite of that – about making yourself vulnerable, opening yourself up to whatever’s there and letting the place leave its mark on you

This quotation from Benedict Allen* speaks to me because it effectively provides an echo of all human experiences…if we can recognise it.

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Why is missiology significant?

“Missiology … what is that?”

A reaction I have not infrequently experienced when telling people about what I have been or am studying. My Dad, for some time after I graduated with my Master’s, regularly needed reminding “What is that degree again?” (Eventually, I answered by giving him a framed copy of my diploma). Somehow “Intercultural Studies” doesn’t communicate or stay well in the memory and “Missiology” doesn’t fare much better.

So what are they all about and why might they be significant or relevant to life today? Continue reading “Why is missiology significant?”

Was Asian tsunami God’s judgement?

Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, reportedly pointedout that the tsunami “could well test people’s faith in God.” This theme was picked up by an interesting article in an online BBC Magazine, which represented the views of a Christian, a Hindu, a Buddhist, a Muslim and an Atheist, (why not a Jewish viewpoint, however?) “coming to terms with events in SE Asia.”

Appropriately enough, in our supposedly postmodern, pluralistic age, the final and probably most balanced comment made upon the article was by a pagan, urging people of all faiths and beliefs to continue in them, as well as in the strength of the human spirit. Compelling though this argument is, however, the tsunami tragedy almost inevitably forces faith into a “position.”

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