Beacons Way 1 — Llangadog to Carreg Cennen

Trail 1 of Beacons Way undertaken by Tuesday Walkers Society

Demanding 9 miles
Overcast; fine, misty rain; blustery wind

BW-EW1-elevation

A demanding 9-mile linear walk from the eastern end of the Beacons Way, at Llangadog, passing through the settlement of Bethlehem, where we entered the bounds of the Brecon Beacons National Park, through to Castle Carreg Cennen; total ascent 1918ft.

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Walking the Beacons Way

The Beacons Way is an iconic walk, established in 2005, by John Samson, of the Brecon Beacons Park Society. It runs for just under 100 miles along the length of the Brecon Beacons National Park. It is a challenging route, though well within the reaches of a fit and competent hill walker. Demanding uphill climbs and undulating ridges give spectacular views of the National Park, its varied landscapes and its wildlife.

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Mynydd y Betws

Grade C+. 9 miles

Route : 9.2mi. OS Explorer
Date: Sunday, December 27, 2015. Weather: Wind, rain, fog.
Elevation: 990 ft. 3h 33m moving time. 4h 52m elapsed time. Av. pace 23 mins/mi.

Mynydd y Betws is a mountain located on the border between Swansea and Carmarthenshire, south Wales. It is the highest mountain in Swansea, and the highest land between the River Loughor and the Upper Clydach River.

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Meidrim

Grade B. 9 miles.

GPX route overlain on 1:25k OS map
Date: Saturday 28 November 2015. Weather: Strong winds; showery.
Route elevation. Total climb 930ft. Elapsed time 4:24. Moving time 3:19. Average pace 21:55 mins / mile.

This ramble provides a demanding walk, encircling the village of Meidrim, to the east and north, twice crossing the Afon (River) Dewi Fawr. The diverse route incorporates hills, stiles and tracks, cattle pastures, equine meadows, cropped fields, farmyards, woodlands, streams and springs. The keen-eyed walker can expect to spot red kite and buzzard and glimpses of a small waterfall. In an area settled since prehistoric times, the village’s origins are thought to lie in the Iron Age. In the early centuries of the second millennium, Meidrim was an important religious centre. Later it had strong connections with the non-conformist movement. In the 17th century, Meidrim’s vicar was known for fervent preaching and publishing texts and translations in the Welsh language.

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