Port Eynon

Grade C+. 7 miles.

Route. 7.4 miles. OS Explorer
Date: Friday 1 January 2016. Weather: High winds, light rain.
Elevation. Total climb 527ft. Elapsed time 3:04 h:m. Moving time 2:42 h:m. Average pace 21:42/mi.
Context. Encircled numbers, e.g. ②, refer to mile-interval markers, per maps / elevation.

Port Eynon is thought to be named after Prince Einion of Deheubarth or an 11th-century Welsh Prince named Eynon. Eynon is a Welsh surname, evident in the village graveyard. Smuggling is thought to have been a common engagement of the local residents in the 17th century to 19th century. In the second half of the 18th century, through to 1919, a lifeboat was operated from Port Eynon. On several occasions, the lives of lifeboatmen were lost at sea on rescues. A memorial to these men exists in the village churchyard. Port Eynon Point, to the south west of the bay, is the most southerly point of the Gower Peninsula. The bay is part of the designated Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

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Reynoldston

Grade B. 9 miles.

GPX route overlain on 1:25k OS map. Click to zoom.
Date: Sunday 15 November 2015. Weather: Cloudy, light rain, high winds.
Route elevation

Taking into account the autumnal weather, our company of 12 people (7 men, 5 women) seemed to represent a fair turnout, since both 45+ mph winds and rain towards the end of the day were keenly anticipated at the onset. In the event, much of our walk was spent significantly sheltered from the high winds by woodland and trackside hedges. The temperature continued to be unseasonably mild and the rain pretty-much held off altogether.

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