Discipleship and the Crises of Global Capitalism

IMG_1150Discipleship, as a praxis, relies upon gaining the hearts of people first, before shaping their understanding.

Discipleship is, first of all, a matter of allegiance and alliance. Loyalty and faithfulness to a core set of values. Values that may be: incarnated in a patriarchal figure (Jesus; Rev. Moon; Keynes etc.), written in a set of documents (Talmud; Mao’s Red Book; Deming’s Profound Knowledge) or represented by an institution (Vatican; Conservative Party; Google). Some form of discipleship is at the core of all people movements — be they social, political, religious or industrial. Popular (of the people) movements have phenomenal potential to impact and transform societies and nations. Witness the Arab Spring. Or the Revolutions of Russia, France and America. Or Nazism. None of these would have succeeded without becoming popular movements. Or without the making of disciples in the earliest stages of revolution. Read more

Was Asian tsunami God’s judgement?

Archbishop of Canterbury, Dr Rowan Williams, reportedly pointedout that the tsunami “could well test people’s faith in God.” This theme was picked up by an interesting article in an online BBC Magazine, which represented the views of a Christian, a Hindu, a Buddhist, a Muslim and an Atheist, (why not a Jewish viewpoint, however?) “coming to terms with events in SE Asia.”

Appropriately enough, in our supposedly postmodern, pluralistic age, the final and probably most balanced comment made upon the article was by a pagan, urging people of all faiths and beliefs to continue in them, as well as in the strength of the human spirit. Compelling though this argument is, however, the tsunami tragedy almost inevitably forces faith into a “position.”

Continue reading “Was Asian tsunami God’s judgement?”